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99% of resumes divide their information into two sections: <strong>Education</strong> and <strong>Work Experience</strong>. There's a reason for this. Potential employers want to know about your education to see what your interests are, what your talents are, if you're generally pretty smart, and if you have a nice looking institution to put next to your name. They want to know about your work experience so they can tell how you're able to handle the day-to-day responsibilities of a workplace and if you can meet the minimum requirements of the job.<strong> </strong>

Mapping out your college schedule is always a tug-of-war between short-term and long-term gain. You don't want a schedule that's too hard or too easy (because that just means you're putting off the hard schedule for later). You need to keep in mind the delicate balance between core requirements, credits for your major, and electives.

The amount of money parents contribute to their kids' college education is dropping. Or, more accurately, it's struggling to keep up. As recently as 2010, parents paid for 37% of the total money spent on college education around the country from their own income. Three years later, that amount has dropped 10%, with grants and scholarships now taking over a greater percentage of the heavy lifting.

It's a tough time to be a student. Landing a halfway decent job is always a struggle, but recent graduates have to deal with a weak economy and devalued degrees, all while more and more of them need to for their education.

College students living on campus need to adjust to a life spent mostly in dorm rooms, lecture halls, the library, and the college bookstore. But they also need to adjust to that hallmark of dorm life: the communal bathroom. It's a pretty dramatic departure from whatever routine you'd established up to this point unless you grew up in a home with a couple dozen siblings.

<a href="http://blogdotbookbytedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/istock_000014661989xsmall.jpg"><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-1724" src="http://blogdotbookbytedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/istock_000014661989xsmall.jpg" alt="Young woman smoking" width="482" height="249" /></a>According to Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, <a href="http://www.no-smoke.org/goingsmokefree.php?id=447">1,182 colleges</a> in the U.S. have campus-wide smoking bans. To illustrate just how much this trend has taken off recently, back in 2010, that number was only 420. (There's got to be some joke in that second stat, right?) Not all schools have come to this decision on their own: Oklahoma, Iowa, Arkansas, and, earlier this summer, Louisiana have all issued smoking bans to all public institutions statewide.

<a href="http://blogdotbookbytedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/istock_000010312974xsmall.jpg"><img class="size-full wp-image-1718 alignright" src="http://blogdotbookbytedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/istock_000010312974xsmall.jpg" alt="A football sitting on a fanned-out stack of 20 dollar bills." width="401" height="299" /></a> The bigger the business of college sports gets, the more the line between student and professional blurs. They already don't make any money on <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/id/45768248">jersey sales</a> (though most schools just sell jerseys with numbers, not names). And they also don't see a dime for having their name and likeness used in official NCAA video games. That's the official practice, but it may or may not be... technically speaking... legal. Starting with former UCLA player Ed O'Bannon, a total of seven college athletes have joined together on a<a href="http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/college-football/news/20130718/obannon-lawsuit-college-players-ncaa/"> long-brewing class-action lawsuit</a> against the NCAA, Electronic Arts (EA), and the Collegiate Licensing Company (CLC) for licensing out their likeness without permission. This could become a major case, not so much because of what it means for videogames, but because the only way the NCAA has a case is to argue that college athletes should not be granted the same rights as professionals, that their work and their likeness are not their own property, but the property of the college they attend. If the NCAA loses, that sets a precedent for many, many more cases regarding the professional nature of the college athlete.

The traditional idea of a college town is one that's truly built up around the college. These towns have bars and restaurants packed with students. They root for the school's sports teams, especially the local hotels and motels who fill up with visiting family during games and graduations.

It's no fun being an intern. If you're lucky enough to get an internship that actually pays you, it's probably chump change. It's unlikely you're doing the work you want to be doing. You're almost entirely at the mercy of the company you're working for, and they don't have much reason to treat you as well as their normal employees.

This morning, the Supreme Court kicked off its summer blockbuster season with a long-brewing case on affirmative action. We first talked about the case last October, where an aspiring college student named Abigail Fisher sued the University of Texas: Austin for discrimination after not being accepted.

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