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As the provisions in the Affordable Care Act start rolling out, the state of Colorado decided to spread awareness with one of the most confusing ad campaigns I've ever seen. <a href="http://blogdotbookbytedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/keg_stand.jpg"><img class="aligncenter size-large wp-image-1853" src="http://blogdotbookbytedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/keg_stand.jpg?w=540" alt="keg_stand" width="540" height="540" /></a> Let's catalog this ad's many crimes against humanity:

Every year, there are a handful of costumes (usually something topical) that dominate Halloween. This is especially true in college, where the resources you have to throw together a decent costume are usually pretty limited. Here's our list of ten costumes, for Halloween 2013, you're basically guaranteed to see walking around this year, ranked on the Heath Ledger as Joker Terrifying Scale.

According to an article published in the science journal Nature, scientists from MIT and Harvard have managed to observe light photons as particles. That means that while light doesn't really have matter or mass in the way we normally understand it, it can still ...

Book banning always struck me as a special kind of terrible. Not necessarily because of direct harm done -- a student forbidden from reading, say <i>Adventures of Huckleberry Finn</i>, is not a different end result than just not having that book on the syllabus -- but because of the principle. There's no greater insult to the very idea of education and to the discerning capabilities of young minds than to say, "You students can't handle this book. You need to be protected from it."

In 1990, at the height of C&H's popularity, Watterson delivered the commencement speech at his alma mater, Kenyon University. It was an excellent speech on the variable definitions of success, lauding people who seek happiness and fulfillment in their work, even if that means turning down more profitable opportunities.

99% of resumes divide their information into two sections: <strong>Education</strong> and <strong>Work Experience</strong>. There's a reason for this. Potential employers want to know about your education to see what your interests are, what your talents are, if you're generally pretty smart, and if you have a nice looking institution to put next to your name. They want to know about your work experience so they can tell how you're able to handle the day-to-day responsibilities of a workplace and if you can meet the minimum requirements of the job.<strong> </strong>

Mapping out your college schedule is always a tug-of-war between short-term and long-term gain. You don't want a schedule that's too hard or too easy (because that just means you're putting off the hard schedule for later). You need to keep in mind the delicate balance between core requirements, credits for your major, and electives.

The amount of money parents contribute to their kids' college education is dropping. Or, more accurately, it's struggling to keep up. As recently as 2010, parents paid for 37% of the total money spent on college education around the country from their own income. Three years later, that amount has dropped 10%, with grants and scholarships now taking over a greater percentage of the heavy lifting.

It's a tough time to be a student. Landing a halfway decent job is always a struggle, but recent graduates have to deal with a weak economy and devalued degrees, all while more and more of them need to for their education.

College students living on campus need to adjust to a life spent mostly in dorm rooms, lecture halls, the library, and the college bookstore. But they also need to adjust to that hallmark of dorm life: the communal bathroom. It's a pretty dramatic departure from whatever routine you'd established up to this point unless you grew up in a home with a couple dozen siblings.

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