Posts in the student loans category | Bookbyte

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Posts in student loans

Nifty tips to help college students delay financial aid payments after graduation.

The best way to survive the ramen years is to budget. But before we say anything else, listen up.

According to OnCampus research, the average student sells back three books at the end of each semester. Most students sell back to one of three places: their campus bookstore, Amazon, or an online textbook marketplace like Bookbyte. The average student makes about 33 bucks back per book, according to the 2015 research.

Confidence is great for many a thing. Like when you're working up the nerve to ask the cute person at the bar to dance, or when you're about to give a speech to a room of your peers. But overconfidence is best avoided, especially when mixed with ignorance.

They're called "4-year universities" for a reason, right? Then why are more and more students finding it takes them five, six, sometimes seven years to earn their bachelor's degree? Worse, many students aren't even making it to graduation day. From the start, students are set on a path to earn their degree in at least five years from the advice of their counselors.

Yesterday, the US Education Department's Twitter account for financial aid sent out a tweet saying "If this is you, you better fill out your FAFSA" followed by a link to their site and a screenshot from this scene from the movie Bridesmaids, complete with the caption "Help me, I'm poor."

In a move that mirrors the proposal in Oregon we talked about a few months back, Canadian province Nova Scotia has voted to eliminate interest on college student loans. The legislation is a deliberate and explicit move to remove the crippling financial burden of debt from new students as they start their careers.

This winter has brought some of the worst weather in recent memory. If you've been bombarded with snow, ice, and sub-zero winds—or even if you're just tired of hearing about them—you can find some much-needed mental respite by sitting down and planning your spring break. However, before you start booking your tickets and packing your bags, be sure to start off on the right foot financially.

Back in the summer, the Oregon State Legislature agreed to a plan that would allow students to attend public universities and community colleges for free. In return, the student agrees to pay a small percent of his or her income after graduation.

The amount of money parents contribute to their kids' college education is dropping. Or, more accurately, it's struggling to keep up. As recently as 2010, parents paid for 37% of the total money spent on college education around the country from their own income. Three years later, that amount has dropped 10%, with grants and scholarships now taking over a greater percentage of the heavy lifting.