Posts in the Education category | Bookbyte

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Posts in Education

Mapping out your college schedule is always a tug-of-war between short-term and long-term gain. You don't want a schedule that's too hard or too easy (because that just means you're putting off the hard schedule for later). You need to keep in mind the delicate balance between core requirements, credits for your major, and electives.

The amount of money parents contribute to their kids' college education is dropping. Or, more accurately, it's struggling to keep up. As recently as 2010, parents paid for 37% of the total money spent on college education around the country from their own income. Three years later, that amount has dropped 10%, with grants and scholarships now taking over a greater percentage of the heavy lifting.

It's a tough time to be a student. Landing a halfway decent job is always a struggle, but recent graduates have to deal with a weak economy and devalued degrees, all while more and more of them need to for their education.

The traditional idea of a college town is one that's truly built up around the college. These towns have bars and restaurants packed with students. They root for the school's sports teams, especially the local hotels and motels who fill up with visiting family during games and graduations.

This morning, the Supreme Court kicked off its summer blockbuster season with a long-brewing case on affirmative action. We first talked about the case last October, where an aspiring college student named Abigail Fisher sued the University of Texas: Austin for discrimination after not being accepted.

A four-year college degree isn't for everybody. I'd be reluctant to even say it's for people. However, everybody needs and deserves an education. Our society just needs to do a better job recognizing the validity of the huge variety of types of education for different types of people, interests, and careers.

The further along students get in their education, and the closer they get to entering the workforce, the more the line between the two starts to blur. College athletes, for example, aren't getting paid for their athleticism, other than the lucky ones offered scholarships. But in many cases, their hard work is still making truckloads of money for their universities.

Pre-college, summer school is hung over the heads of students like a threat for not working hard enough. That's already an unfair stigma for grade school and high school students, but for college, that stigma truly makes no sense. If you're reluctant to sacrifice your three months of sunshine for a few spare credits, here's a few reasons you might want to reconsider.

For some, the final paper is even more dreaded than the final exam. At least with an exam, you can only do so much work in the time given. With a paper, there's this sinister feeling that you always could have done more. So naturally, you put off thinking about it as long as you can.

When it's time to graduate, while you're sitting there sweating through your academic robes in the summer sun, you'll start to listen to the names of your class (or department, depending on how your school does it), anticipating friends' names so you can cheer a little louder. The odds are pretty good that you won't hear at least one name you expect to. Some people just plain don't want to walk.

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