Posts in the Education category | Bookbyte

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Posts in Education

Apparently, there's a growing conversation among educators about whether or not students should be warned about certain content in advance. Think of this as, like, a very specific rating system about upcoming content.

You might have heard that the SAT is getting redesigned again. Among other changes, the plan is to shift back to the old 1600 point scale that old farts like me took. (That's the way it was pre-2005.) It'll also be the first test available in both print and digital form, a change that seems almost comically overdue. These changes won't take effect until 2016.

Misery loves company. A new study out of USC argues that stress is reduced when the experience is shared. In other words, complaining about your ridiculous deadlines, unreasonable professors, and brutal workloads with your classmates is actually a valid coping mechanism.

I would prefer not to live in a country in which rhetoric about the purpose of college urges kids from privileged backgrounds to be innovators and creators while the poor kids who do very well in school are taught to be educated, capable employees. This quote comes from this article, titled "The Danger of Telling Poor Kids That College Is the Key to Social Mobility" by Andrew Simmons.

A recent article by the independent education journal The Hechinger Report discussed the troubling trend of cutting back on credits and removing core requirements by many major universities. Sometimes it's because students graduating from those programs are "low-productive." Sometimes it's because politicians want to cut back on the tax dollars going to public universities. Sometimes it's because university administrations want better graduation rates.

Every once in awhile a final comes around that just plain kicks you in the butt, no matter how long you've prepared or hard you've studied. Here are the Bookbyte team's worst finals experiences.

Back in the summer, the Oregon State Legislature agreed to a plan that would allow students to attend public universities and community colleges for free. In return, the student agrees to pay a small percent of his or her income after graduation.

How is doing research for a paper like procrastinating? Both existed before the internet, but now you can do them both so much faster.

A question of much debate triggering professors and students alike. Can we find a middle ground or is there truly a 'right' way to test?

There's a problem that always seems to be at the root of the debate over education policy: When do we standardize and when do we personalize? If we don't standardize enough, there's no guarantee that everyone will receive the same opportunities and the same basic education.

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