Posts in the Education category | Bookbyte

The Bookbyte Blog

Posts in Education

How long do you estimate the average college freshman can read their book/notes and be effectively learning? 4-5 hours? 1 hour? 25 minutes? 5 minutes? That's the question Marty Lobdell starts his Study Less Study Smart seminar with. According to Lobdell, the prime study time is 25 minutes. After that, you're just wasting your time staring at random strings of words and not retaining any of it.

After getting backlash from both Democrats and Republicans to Obama's 529 tax plan that would tax college savings—a luxury that's attributed to the wealthier class—Obama has decided to scrap the plan that would help the lower and middle-income students pay for college.

Ah, the start of the term, when countless shiny new textbooks are traded to college students in exchange for an arm and a leg. Meanwhile, last term's books are being sold back for what seems like pennies on the dollar. It's amazing how frequently textbooks get "updated" to new editions and seem to depreciate overnight. What then happens to all the old editions? They magically transform into some of the greatest bargains of our time!

Google's search engine algorithms are getting smarter. Great, right? What if the trade-off is that we're getting dumber? Is it beneficial to find immediate answers through a quick Google search? Not if we're getting too lazy to ask the right questions.

They're called "4-year universities" for a reason, right? Then why are more and more students finding it takes them five, six, sometimes seven years to earn their bachelor's degree? Worse, many students aren't even making it to graduation day. From the start, students are set on a path to earn their degree in at least five years from the advice of their counselors.

Whoever you are, whatever your SAT score and high school report card look like, you could take a course at Harvard, Yale, MIT, Stanford, or Johns Hopkins right this minute. These elite schools, among many others, have begun to offer open, online, not-for-credit courses to anyone who wants to take them. These are casually referred to as MOOCs, massive open online courses.

Avatars, guilds, quests, XP—sounds like the newest installment of World of Warcraft, but for a growing number of classrooms, it's just another day at school. Lee Sheldon, a video-game designer and Game Design teacher at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, came up with the idea of "gaming" his lesson plans after becoming bored with the traditional teaching format of: lecture, quiz, grade, repeat.

You know LinkedIn. It's that social network you meticulously maintain but never look at unless you're applying for an internship or get an email because someone endorsed you. It's the most useful and least fun way to spend your time on social media. In a new, potentially trend-setting redesign, Cornell University's graduate school of business management allows applicants to fill in most application information automatically. All the applicant needs to do is connect to his or her LinkedIn profile.

Until recently, a Florida high school had a summer reading program that had everyone in the school, regardless of grade level, reading the same book. However, the school's administration canned the program over the content of this year's book, Little Brother by Cory Doctorow.

The college years are full of tough assignments, hectic schedules, and challenging social situations. It's easy to shrink back and become overwhelmed in that environment, but that can lead to regret later. Inspiring TED talks are always a good go-to for anyone who needs a bit of thought-provoking insight. The following eight talks are particularly helpful to college students.

Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6